About Chris Giudice

About Chris Giudice

Contact: christiangiudice@hotmail.com

Twitter: chrisgiudice

 

Christian Giudice grew up in Haddonfield, NJ. He graduated from Villanova University in 1997 and earned his Masters in Journalism from Temple University. He has contributed articles to the Gloucester County Times, the Ann Arbor News, Boxing Digest, The Jerusalem Post, Clemson Alumni Magazine, South Jersey Magazine, Notifight.com, Sports Illustrated, and various boxing websites. The book has been featured in Ring Magazine, KO Magazine, UK newspapers and on a host of sports radio talk shows. He currently teaches awesome students at Parkwood High School in Monroe, NC.

 

Christian Giudice

ENG I/IV teacher

Contact: Email: christiangiudice@hotmail.com

 

ENG I

Novels/Plays

Fahrenheit 451

Odyssey (complemented by Into the Wild)

Someone to Run With

 Important Excerpts

Grapes of Wrath

 

First vocabulary list: 

Word bank: incendiary, devious, pejorative, celerity, overt, maelstrom, avid, myopic, halcyon

 

ENG III

Keys to being successful as you begin the new school year:

1) Designate specific times/days when you can come for tutoring sessions. Let me know a day in advance so I can schedule accordingly.

2) Get book copies now for the third six weeks.

3) Begin to find a poet whom you are passionate about.

4) Read the first article of the week + begin to familiarize yourself with its nuances.

5) Learn about notes to teacher and get comfortable with logging into this website.

6) If you are absent, please check this page AND consult with someone in your class about what you missed.

First set of vocabulary terms for first week: accentuate, ambiguous, comprehensive, felicitous, intricacy, introspective, provocative, rhetorical, usurp, vernacular

Article of the Week: Bowe Bergdahl article and analysis

Title: Bowe Bergdahl: hero or traitor? War doesn’t allow an easy answer

Second Article:  The O’Bannon Ruling: College Athletes Win

Assessment: Tuesday/Wednesday

First novel:  The Great Gatsby

Poetry Notes:

1) Emotional, Intellectual, Allusion and Sound

Powerpoint: Types of poetry

ENG III – Common Core standards texts

1) Thoreau, Walden

2) Emerson, Society and Solitude

3) United States, Bill of Rights

4) Wright, Richard, Black Boy

5) Chesterton, The Fallacy of Success

6) Paine, Common Sense

 

ENG I 

Homework for Thursday, August 28

Complete opening paragraph of fiction piece.

ENG IV 

Keys to being successful as you begin the new school year:

1) Begin to think about topics that interest you regarding the research project

2) Get the materials that we spoke about in class throughout the week

3) If you have a job, begin to consider what days and times you will be available for tutoring

 

Outline from Thursday’s class

Thesis: It is entirely possible to navigate through the spectrums of your professional and personal life

I) Professional Life
Involvement and Impact
A) Promoting biographies
– Posting press releases
– Book Signing dates
B) Connecting with book readers through
-Twitter
– Facebook
– Linkedin
– Goodreads
C) Trying to stay updated and abreast of changes to education.
– News onTwitter
– Trends on Twitter
– Contacts on Linkedin

II) Social life

A) Connecting with a group of people to get together
B) Finding out about friends’ milestones
– pregnancies
– engagements
– loss
– birthdays
C) Establishing relationships with old friends.
– Family
– long lost friends
– colleagues
D) Opposing Viewpoint – Devoid of meaningful relationships
– Inability to express emotion
– Too saturated with niceties
– Conversations lack depth

E) Professional woes
– Distractions
– Too many opportunities for criticisms

Building around quotations:

 

A)

“Social media shapes how we approach each work day,” said life coach, Cheryl Swoopes.

B)
A)

“Never let your Facebook friends replace the people you love,” said UNCC college counselor, Terri Caulkey.

B)

 

A)

“The beauty of social media is that it makes work so much easier. Everything is at your fingertips,” said job coach and Charlotte headhunter, Barry Gold.

B)

 

 

 

 

HW for Thursday, August 28

In preparation for your essay, copy down two effective quotes from articles that show  connection between social media and human intimacy as well as five applicable quotes.

 

First set of vocabulary terms for first week: banal, bellicose, finesse, glib, lugubrious, nefarious, nemesis, pseudonym, purloin

First article of the week: Why Americans See Israel the Way They Do

Assessement: Tuesday/Wednesday

Poetry Notes:

1) Emotional, Intellectual, Allusion and Sound.

Poems to Analyze:

Fern Hill, Dylan Thomas

John Crowe Ransom, Janet Waking

E.A. Robinson, Richard Cory

Thomas Hardy, The Man He Killed and Going and Staying

2) Image

The reader needs to be able to interpret the image’s contribution to the poem.

Poems to Analyze:

Howard Nemerov’s, The Salt Garden and The Snow Globe

Auden, Sonnet XVIII (from In Time of War)

Iliad (prose) Homer

from Macbeth, Shakespeare

3) Rhythm

– Use of elision

– Tension between mechanical and sounded rhythm

– Use of syncopation

Poems to Analyze

The Little Black Boy, William Blake

The Cataract, Southey

 

4) Slowing Devices and Quickening the Pace + caesuras

(Focal point: short vowel sounds, internal rhyme, and fast anapestic rhythm)

First novel: 1984 by George Orwell

Novel/Film comparison: Divergent

 

ENG IV

English IV completes the global perspective initiated in
English II. Though its focus is on European (Western,
Southern, Northern) literature, this course includes important
U.S. documents and literature (texts influenced by European
philosophy or action). At least one Shakespearean play
will be included. Interdisciplinary informational text and
multimodal presentations will encompass the writing,
speaking and listening skills.

 

ENG III

English III is an in-depth study of U.S. literature and U.S.

literary nonfiction especially foundational works and

documents from the 17th century through the early 20th
century. At least one Shakespearean play will be included
along with interdisciplinary informational writing and
multimodal presentations focusing on speaking and listening
skills.

 

Crosswalks: 

The English I course provides a foundational study of literary genres (novels, short stories, poetry, drama, literary nonfiction). It should include influential U.S. documents and one Shakespearean play. English II introduces literary global perspectives focusing on literature from the Americas (Caribbean, Central, South, and North), Africa, Eastern Europe, Asia, Oceania, and the Middle East. Influential U.S. documents and a Shakespearean play should be included. English III is an in-depth study of U.S. literature and U.S. literary nonfiction especially foundational works and documents from the 17thcentury through the early 20th century. At least one Shakespearean play should be included.

English IV completes the global perspective initiated in English II. Though its focus is on European (Western, Southern, Northern)
literature, this course includes important U.S. documents and literature (texts influenced by European philosophy or action). At least one Shakespearean play should be included.

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